design - Land Rover section

 

Series Land Rover
Technical Specifications and Reference Data

Contents

Engine tune-up data & tips

Torque settings
Fluids
Electrical
Front end alignment specs

 

 

2.25L Petrol Reference Data and Tech Tips:

DISTRIBUTOR:

POINT GAP: .014-.016

TIP: Make sure distributor cam lobes are properly lubricated

TIMING: 6 BTDC   using U.S, standard regular gas

TIP: Use this as a starting point. Older engines may require more advance because of wear in the timing chain.

FIRING ORDER: 1-3-4-2

DISTRIBUTOR ROTATION: Counter clockwise

FINDING No 1 SPARK PLUG ON THE DISTRIBUTOR:  No 1 plug is the plug wire outlet on the distributor that is closest to the No 1 spark plug.  The No 1 spark plug is the one closest to the front of the engine.

ITEMS TO CHECK: Shaft "wobble" (can the point gap be changed by the lateral shaft movement?). Weak advance springs (twist the distributor shaft. It should snap back all the way). Check the condition of the high tension lead. Check the vacuum advance dashpot. Also be sure to lubricate the inner shaft (below the rotor). Check the cap for cracks or carbon tracks between the posts, wear on the center spring loaded post and deterioration of the side posts.

 

SPARK PLUGS:

TYPES: For both 7:1 an 8:1 engines up through 1984, CHAMPION RN11YC 4 (nearest to original) or NGK BP5ES (a good option). NGK BP6ES is recommended for 1985 or newer engines.

GAP: .032

TIP: Plug wires need to be changed periodically. Carbon core (resistor) cables need to be replaced every two years. Solid core (wire) cables should be replaced every 4-5 years.

 

VALVE ADJUSTMENT:

.010 (HOT OR COLD)

TIP: Check rocker shaft and arm bushing wear by pushing each rocker arm at the tip. There should be no side to side wobble (sliding OK). You should not be able to see any vertical movement of the rocker arm on the shaft (other than rotational). If there is any movement other than smooth rotational or side to side sliding the rocker bushings and probably the rocker shaft should be replaced.

The rounded surface of the rocker arm that meets the valve stem should be smooth without a wear depression. A wear depression will keep you from adjusting the valves properly. Any good automotive machine shop can resurface the rocker arm rocker surface.

Sometimes, right after the head is resurfaced, work done on the rocker arm assembly, or a thinner valve cover gasket is used you will hear a tap high in the engine. One of the screws holding the valve adjustment plate to the valve cover can sometimes come into contact with a rocker arm.

 

CRANKING COMPRESSION:

NOTE: Inexpensive compression test gauges are not known for accuracy and your readings will be affected by the temperature of the engine. Use the number you read as a guideline only. Differences between cylinders are more important than the overall number. More than 20 lbs variation between the highest cylinder and the lowest cylinder warrants head removal.

Compression values provided in the manual were taken with the engine at full operating temperature.  Metal contracts as it cools so expect your readings to be lower.  The difference between a reading taken at full operating temperature and cold can easily be in the 20 to 40 pound range.   Compression for a hot engine is approximately 145 PSI for 7:1 heads and 160 to 170 PSI for 8:1 heads

 

DETERMINING COMPRESSION RATIO OF YOUR 2.25L PETROL ENGINE:

There are multiple head castings used on the engine over the years. The two standard compression ratios used by Rover are 7:1 and 8:1.

The easiest way to determine your head's compression ratio is to look at the top surface between the valve cover and the carburetor. You will see a head bolt located there. On some heads there is a flat rectangular boss under the head bolt that extends towards the carburetor to the edge of the head.

If your head does not have this boss it is an early 7:1 compression head. If your head has the boss it is a later casting that came in both 7:1 and 8:1 versions, depending upon the country the car was originally sold in. If the boss has no stamping on the top or a big 7 it is a 7:1 head and was probably originally sold outside the United States. If the head has a large 8 stamped on the top (could look like two '0's) then it is an 8:1 head.

 

OIL PRESSURE: 45-65 LBS at driving speeds with engine at normal operating temperature.

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2.25L Diesel Reference Data and Tech Tips:

DISTRIBUTOR PUMP TIMING: 16 degrees for early type pump, 15 degrees for late type pump. The power that the diesel produces is very dependent upon correct timing.

 

VALVE ADJUSTMENT: .010 (HOT OR COLD)

TIP: Check rocker shaft and arm bushing wear by pushing each rocker arm at the tip. There should be no side to side wobble (sliding OK). You should not be able to see any vertical movement of the rocker arm on the shaft (other than rotational). If there is any movement other than smooth rotational or side to side sliding, the rocker bushings and probably the rocker shaft should be replaced.

The rounded surface of the rocker arm that meets the valve stem should be smooth without a wear depression. A wear depression will keep you from adjusting the valves properly. Any good automotive machine shop can resurface the rocker arm rocker surface.

 

CRANKING COMPRESSION (23:1 compression):

Diesel compression testing requires an expensive diesel specific gauge. Most people who run a compression test have it done at a diesel shop or rent the gauge. While a compression test is an important tool for assessing the overall condition of an engine, some people just rely upon noises and smoke tell tales then guess the engine condition from them.

Compression tests should be taken when the engine is at operating temperature. Remove a glow plug, screw in an adapter, connect the Diesel pressure gauge. Compression for a newly rebuilt 2.25L diesel engine should be in the 425 lbs range. Diesels can run at much lower compression, the main concern is that each of the cylinders are pretty much equal with one another.

Low power on an older engine that is properly timed can be a result of wear causing overall low compression.

TIP: Diesel engines send out smoke signals to let you know about certain ailments.

Symptom: Significant blow by of oily gray smoke coming out the oil fill and breather tubes building a significant layer of deposits under your hood and all around the engine bay.

Likely causes: bad/worn rings, badly worn pistons,and possibly a out of round or deeply scored cylinder(s)

Symptom: More than normal black smoke and higher diesel odor coming out of the tail pipe. Lower power output as the symptom advances. Smoke most likely to be significant at startup, acceleration and off throttle deceleration.

Likely cause: Bad valves

Symptom: Large amounts of smoke out the tail pipe at engine start that goes away soon afterward.

Likely cause: Worn valve guides.

Symptom: Very low engine power, loud clanking sound coming from the engine at the expected rate of one cylinder firing. Sound seems to be coming from the top of the engine.

Likely cause: broken valve spring.

OIL PRESSURE: 45-65 LBS at driving speeds with engine at normal operating temperature.


 

2.6L petrol Reference Data and Tech TIPS:

DISTRIBUTOR:

POINT GAP: .014-.016

TIP: Make sure distributor cam lobes are properly lubricated

TIMING: 2 BTDC for 7:1 engine, 2 ATDC for 7.8:1 engine

TIP: Use this as a starting point. Older engines may require more advance due to wear in the timing chain.

FIRING ORDER: 1-5-3-6-2-4

DISTRIBUTOR ROTATION: Counter clockwise

ITEMS TO CHECK: Shaft "wobble" (can the point gap be changed by the lateral shaft movement?). Weak advance springs (twist the distributor shaft. It should snap back all the way). Check the condition of the high tension lead. Check the vacuum advance dashpot. Also be sure to lubricate the inner shaft (below the rotor). Check the cap for cracks or carbon tracks between the posts, wear on the center spring loaded post and deterioration of the side posts.

 

SPARK PLUGS:

TYPES: For both European an North American versions, NGK B6ES

GAP: .029 to .032 inches

TIP: Plug wires need to be changed periodically. Carbon core (resistor) cables need to be replaced every two years. Solid core (wire) cables should be replaced every 4-5 years.

 

VALVE ADJUSTMENT:

Intake valves .006, exhaust valves 0.10 (HOT OR COLD)

TIP: Check rocker shaft and arm bushing wear by pushing each rocker arm at the tip. There should be no side to side wobble (sliding OK). You should not be able to see any vertical movement of the rocker arm on the shaft (other than rotational). If there is any movement other than smooth rotational or side to side sliding the rocker bushings and probably the rocker shaft should be replaced.

The rounded surface of the rocker arm that meets the valve stem should be smooth without a wear depression. A wear depression will keep you from adjusting the valves properly. Any good automotive machine shop can resurface the rocker arm rocker surface.

 

CRANKING COMPRESSION:

NOTE: Inexpensive compression test gauges are not known for accuracy. Use the number you read as a guideline only. Differences between cylinders are more important than the overall number. More than 20 lbs variation between the highest cylinder and the lowest cylinder warrants head removal.

Compression tests should be taken when the engine is at operating temperature. The readings will be lower after the engine has cooled and the metal contracted. The difference between a reading taken at operating temperature and cold can easily be in the 20 to 30 pound range.

Compression readings for a fresh engine taken at operating temperature should be around 140 PSI for 7:1 head and 170 to 175 PSI for 7.8:1 head.

 

OIL PRESSURE: 30 - 45 LBS at driving speeds with engine at normal operating temperature.

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TORQUE SETTINGS:

2.25L petrol engine:

Cylinder head: 65 FT. LBS.
Main bearing cap bolts: 85 ft. Lbs
Rod bolts: 35ft lbs for bolts with machined threads, 25 ft lbs for bolts with rolled threads (drilled indentation at thread end). Always use new nuts.
Rocker pedestals: 18 ft lbs.
Cam shaft gear bolts: 30 ft. lbs
Intake manifold to exhaust manifold: 17 ft lbs. Keep bolts loose until after both intake and exhaust manifolds are properly torqued to the cylinder head.
Intake and exhaust manifolds to cylinder head: 17 ft lbs. Tighten from the center out to the ends.
Flywheel bolts:  60 to 65 ft. lbs
Crankshaft pulley bolt:  200 ft. lbs

 

2.25L diesel engine:

Cylinder head: 90 ft lbs.
Main bearing cap bolts: 100 ft lbs
Rod bolts: 25 ft lbs
Rocker pedestals: 18 ft lbs.
Diesel fuel injector fittings: 6 to 8 ft lbs (DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN)
Cam shaft gear bolts: 30 ft. lbs
Intake manifold to exhaust manifold: 17 ft lbs. Keep bolts loose until after both intake and exhaust manifolds are properly torqued to the cylinder head.
Intake and exhaust manifolds to cylinder head: 17 ft lbs. Tighten from the center out to the ends.
Flywheel bolts:  60 to 65 ft. lbs
Crankshaft pulley bolt:  200 ft. lbs

 

2.6L petrol engine:

Cylinder head: 50 ft lbs (A bolts), 30 ft lbs (B bolts, outside smaller bolts)
Main bearing cap bolts: 2.6L petrol: 75 ft lbs
Rocker pedestals: 18 ft lbs.
Rod bolts: 20 ft lbs

 

General drive train:

Steel engine mounts to engine block: 80 lb. ft. (when lock washers are used in place of lock tabs)
Clutch pressure plate: 22 to 25 ft lbs (tighten all bolts evenly one turn at a time)
Flywheel: 60 - 65 ft lbs.
Layshaft bolt:  (SII & IIA) 75 ft lbs    (SIII) 65 ft LB
Transmission out put shaft nut: No Spec provided in pre-SIII workshop manuals. SIII factory workshop manual specifies 85 ft lbs.  The Faerie O.D. manual specifies 100ft lbs
Rover differential pinion nut: 85 ft lb
ENV differential pinion nut: 100-120 ft lb
Axle drive flange bolts: 28 ft lbs
Salisbury Differential cover plate: 22 to 25 ft lbs
Castellated axle nut securing axle to Rover drive flange: 10-15 ft
Castellated tie rod end nut: 30 ft lbs
Transfer case output shaft nut: (Font and rear): 85 ft lbs
'U' bolts: 55 to 60 ft lbs (retorque every 12,000 miles)
Shackle bolts:  60 to 70 ft. lbs
Wheel lug nuts:
75-85 ft lbs for all civilian wheels.  100 ft lbs for wolf wheels only

 

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FLUID CAPACITIES:

(values given are all in US measurements)

Note:  GL-5 gear oils have mostly replaced GL-4 gear oils on auto part dealer shelves.  Gl-5 includes additives which will attack the brass bushings & bearings used in your Series Land Rover.   For maximum service life insist upon GL-4 gear oil.

ENGINE OIL:

2.25L four cylinder - 6 1/2 quarts (excluding filter and oil cooler, if fitted)
2.6L six cylinder - 6 quarts

Change interval: every 3000 miles

Type of oil: 20-50 Summer or warm climates, 10W-40 winter for cold climates.

Note:  Since zinc reduces the service life of  catalytic converters, engine oils are now being reformulated with less zinc.  The zinc is found in ZDDP, an additive which reduces engine friction.  This does not affect roller tappet engines such as the Land Rover 4 cylinder. But it does affect all engines with flat tappets by reducing cam shaft and tappet service life.

 

TRANSMISSION:

1 1/2 quarts (Check every 3000 miles min.)

Change interval: 12,000 miles or every fourth engine oil change.

Type of oil: 90W OR 85W90 GL-4 (Synthetics OK, additives OK)

 

TRANSFER CASE:

2 3/4 quarts (Check every 3,000 miles min.)

Change interval: 12,000 miles or every fourth engine oil change.

Type of oil: 90W OR 85W90 GL-4 (Synthetics OK, additives OK)

 

OVERDRIVE:

Fairy: 1/2 quart (check frequently and top up if at all low)

Change interval: 3,000 miles with oil change from maximum life.

Type of oil: 90W OR 85W90 GL-4 (Synthetics OK, additives OK)

 

DIFFERENTIALS:

ROVER TYPE: 1 3/4 quarts front and rear
ENV TYPE: Rear - 1 1/4 quarts, Front - 1-2/3 quarts
Salisbury: 3 quarts

Change interval: 12,000 miles or every fourth engine oil change.

Type of oil: 90W OR 85W90 GL-4 (Synthetics OK)

 

FRONT SWIVELS:

1.2 pints per side

Change interval: 12,000 miles or every fourth engine oil change.

Type of oil: 90W OR 85W90 GL-4

 

STEERING BOX:

As needed

Type of oil: 90W or 85W90 GL-4

Note: Land Rover hub grease designed for CV front axles is perfect for use in Series Land Rover steering boxes and it does not leak out like gear oil often does.

 

 

COOLANT:

2 3/4 GALLONS

Change interval: Twice a year with back flush. Change in Spring and in fall.

Type of coolant: Use 50/50 antifreeze to water for moderate weather.  Extremely cold temperatures require higher percentage of antifreeze. See the label on the antifreeze container. Antifreeze contains pump lubricants and have anti rust properties so should be used during the summer months as well as the winter months.

 

AIR CLEANER


2.25L engine: 1.8 pints
2.6L engine: 1.2 pints

Change interval: 12, 000 miles, or every fourth oil change. Change immediately after traveling in heavy dust conditions.

Type of oil: Whatever is handy and clean

 

FUEL TANK (stock type)


Under seat fuel tank: 12 gallons
Rear fuel tank: 19 gallons

FUEL TANK (common after market with rounded corners and single side seam)


Under seat fuel tank: 11.5 gallons
Rear fuel tank: 18 gallons

 

BRAKE AND CLUTCH FLUID:

Castrol LMA or other DOT 4 brake fluid

Change interval: Once a year on an average.

TIP: DOT 4 brake fluid is hygroscopic. This means it will absorb moisture that will damage brake components. In very damp climates or with extended deep wading the brake fluid should be changed more often to achieve maximum service life from brake and clutch hydraulic systems. You would not need to change the fluid as often in arid climates.

TIP: Brake fluid is very corrosive on paint. Take care not to spill brake fluid on a painted surface. If some spills clean it up immediately and wipe with a wet cloth to dilute any residues.

TIP: Castrol LMA brake fluid was designed to work with your rubber hydraulic components and provide maximum trouble free service life. However any DOT 4 brake fluid will work. You should not use DOT 3 brake fluid in your system.

DOT5, or Silicon brake fluid will work properly in your Land Rover's hydraulic systems but do NOT mix it with any other hydraulic fluid. It has the advantage of not being corrosive to paint or hygroscopic. The disadvantages of using DOT 5 brake fluid are expense and that it can carry tiny air bubbles in the fluid for a long time. This can make the hydraulic systems very hard to bleed for a reliable hard pedal.

TIP: If you should decide to convert from DOT 4 hydraulic fluid to DOT5 fluid you must replace all the rubber parts of the brake system. The different types of brake fluids affect rubber components differently. A seal that has been immersed in DOT4 (or DOT3) fluid will almost always leak when later immersed in DOT5 fluid.

The best time to switch over is when your old brake system is tired and in need of new master and wheel cylinders. Don't to forget to replace the flex hoses at the same time.

 

GREASE:

RECOMMENDED: Any good water resistant grease

INTERVAL: Once every 3000 miles or as soon as practical after wading

TIP: Water will get into 'U' joints and tie rod ends while wading. Left alone, the water will cause premature failure of these components. Adding grease will push any water out of the 'U' joint or tie rod end and should be done at the first reasonable opportunity after wading.

TIP: Always wipe the grease nipple clean prior to adding grease. This will keep dirt from being pushed into the joint.

TIP: This is an excellent time to visually inspect the parts you are greasing. Worn 'U' joints and drive shaft splines will cause added vibration to the drive train. Extreme 'U' joint wear can cause the joint to separate and result in rotating drive shaft with one end loose. When you lube the drive shafts, try to make them wobble by pushing hard back and fourth on the shafts. If there is any sign of looseness in a 'U' joint it should be replaced. Also it is not uncommon for flange bolts to become loose soon after installing a drive shaft The shaking will reveal loose drive shaft bolts.

TIP: This is an excellent time to visually inspect the tie rod ends. Try to shake them. If there is any feel of looseness the tie rod end should be replaced. It is usually a good idea to replace all of them if one is loose since the others may be worn as well. There is a rubber boot around the tie rod joint. This boot keeps grease in, moisture and dirt out. A cracked boot will allow accelerated wear of the joint. A cracked rubber boot should be replaced.

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ELECTRICAL:

BATTERY: Group 27, any brand (12V, positive or negative earth)

FUSES: 35 AMP LUCAS type fuse or AGC 25 AMP for American Bussman type fuse

Note: The British Standard for fuses rated fuses by the current that was guaranteed to make them blow instantly. The American fuse standard rates fuses by the current that they will carry forever which is why different AMP ratings are equivalent.

LIGHT BULBS:

Tail, brake lamp: 1157 (double filament)

Turn signal: 1156 (single filament)

Parking lamp: 89

SII, IIA Instrument panel lamp: 57


Front end alignment specs

Toe-in between 3/64" and 3.32" (1.2mm and 2.4mm0

No adjustment is provided for caster, camber or swivel pin inclination.

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